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Itaewon is known for its western style of food and clothing and therefore is very popular with foreigners, known as Waygooks here in Korea. We decided to have a walk around and look for any food places that we fancied eating at. Paul had seen a sign for Mexican food, and we both were on the hunt to find some. We came across a little Mexican restaurant called ‘Los Amigos’. The food was freshly cooked by a mexican man (well spanish speaking at least) and it tasted fresh with a tasty, not too hot, spice. The frozen lime margaritas were zesty and refreshing; exactly what we needed after a hard day sightseeing. 

 
 
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On Saturday Paul and I decided, that as we had a non eventful day on Friday, that we should go do something. We went to Seoul on the subway, using our new bank cards to pay for everything. However, this was not the case for Paul as his card did not work on any transportation, which meant having to queue up only for the subway for a ticket. Which when you buy a ticket, it’s a card and you pay a 500 won (about 29p) deposit. After your journey, you put your travel card into a machine where you get your deposit back.

The subway is very well organised, and I wasn’t expecting it to be as clean as it was - probably because I only have the London underground to compare it to. However the subway stations have no characteristics like some of London’s stations, like Baker Street’s for example. The Subway map is also in English, which helps very much when trying to work out what station you need to get off at, there is also a handy app for the Korean subway’s called ‘Jihachul’.

We were heading towards Changdeokgung Palace, which was only a few minutes away from the subway station we got off at. We went for lunch in a small traditional Korean café, Paul had bibimbap (rice and vegetables with an egg) and I had stir-fried pork with rice which was succulent, warm and filling. Both of these meals together cost under £7.